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Archive for Color Guard

All About Winter Guard

Everyone has likely heard of Color Guard, but Winter Guard is also an awesome choice. This sportís popularity is growing and spreading across the world. Interested in Winter Guard? Hereís some information about the sport: Winter Guard is performed in a gymnasium. It is a combination of cheerleading, dancing, and baton twirling (as well as other item maneuverings) all in one sport. Winter Guard has its own organization for those interested in the sport all over the world to join. They host competitions regularly. Winter guard teams require a lot of manpower. There are often multiple coaches that lead a team, a choreographer to help plan the moves, and team captains. Teams practice for months for five-minute performances. The timing is crucial during a performance, so teams have to practice setting up, tearing down, and performing in an efficient manner. Creative staging is often a big bonus during Winter Guard performances. Colorful tarps, imaginative backdrops, and other theme

Posted: 6/19/2018

Baton Twirling Across Cultures

Different forms of twirling can be seen throughout the world and across many different cultures. Each tradition combined together to form the sport to how itís practiced today. One country that has a rich history of twirling is that of Switzerland. Back in the Middle Ages, it was custom for urban guilds to perform flag throwing. This practice continued on throughout the years and eventually morphed into the Swiss Yodeling Association. The Swiss Yodeling Association introduced rules and regulations to flag throwing and began hosting competitions. Flag throwing in Switzerland is highly regulated. The size of the flag needs to be precise. There are also 90 regulated swings necessary when performing, which includes many different types of swings. These swings all involve throwing the flag up into the air and catching it by the staff. Another culture that holds twirling in high esteem was that of the Aztecs. They were known for their fire dancing. In Bali, a Fire Dance is regularly pe

Posted: 6/8/2018

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A test post

Posted: 2/6/2018

Three Basic Color Guard Moves

Marching band parades with the girls carrying those colorful flags are so much fun to watch. However, moving these flags to the beat of the music requires a lot of practice and technique also known as color guard moves. Star Line Baton, expert providers of both batons and color guard flags, has compiled some basic color guard moves for those just becoming acquainted with color guard. Right or Left Shoulder Position: Out of these two, the right position would be most common in the color guard routine. Right position will also typically be the position to enter and exit the field. To achieve this position, hold the bottom stopper in your left hand and hold the pole right under the flag with your right hand at the level of your forehead. Keep your left hand at the belly button level with the pole straight and centered with your nose. Right, Left, or Front Present Position: To achieve a front present, start with your right shoulder position and extend your right arm parallel to the g

Posted: 2/14/2017

Dress to Impress With the Perfect Costume to Fit Your Routine

Selecting the perfect costume is essential to any competitor's success. The right costume can make or break your routine and create a lasting impression in the minds of the judges and audience. If you mostly twirl in the marching band, you donít have that much liberty when choosing a costume, but if you compete, youíll have to help choose the right costume.

Posted: 11/10/2014

How to Twirl a Flag

Are you planning to try out for your school's color guard or drill team? If you are, you may need to learn how to twirl a flag. One of the most common techniques in twirling a flag is called a drop spin. To spectators, a drop spin looks like the flag is swiftly spinning in front of the twirler's body. To perform a drop spin, follow these simple instructions:

  1. Begin with the basic holding position - holding the flag upright with your right hand on the middle of the pole, just above your nose in height. Grasp the bottom end of the flag pole with your left hand just over your belly button.
  2. Release your left hand from the pole and twist the flag counterclockwise with your right hand, forcing your thumb (and the flag) down. Grab the pole with your left hand underneath your right hand.
  3. Release the pole with your right hand and twist your left wrist counterclockwise to bring the flag back upright. Replace your right hand back on the pole underneath your left hand with your thumb facing up.
  4. Repeat steps 2-3 and you are doing a drop spin!

Posted: 3/28/2012

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